Watch: Chinese Troops Withdraw En-Masse From Pangong Tso Sectors As Indian Forces Keep Close Watch

Watch: Chinese Troops Withdraw En-Masse From Pangong Tso Sectors As Indian Forces Keep Close WatchChinese withdrawal (Shiv Aroor)

The Indian defence establishment on Tuesday (16 February) released pictures of the Chinese pullback from the Pangong Tso sectors as agreed between the two sides.

Here are the pictures shared by defence journalist Shiv Aroor.

Watch: Chinese Troops Withdraw En-Masse From Pangong Tso Sectors As Indian Forces Keep Close Watch
Watch: Chinese Troops Withdraw En-Masse From Pangong Tso Sectors As Indian Forces Keep Close Watch
Watch: Chinese Troops Withdraw En-Masse From Pangong Tso Sectors As Indian Forces Keep Close Watch
Watch: Chinese Troops Withdraw En-Masse From Pangong Tso Sectors As Indian Forces Keep Close Watch

As reported by Aroor, the Indian defence establishment is keeping a close tab on the Chinese withdrawal and every vehicle, bunker, tank and troop is being watched and validated in the pullback. Both the sides will now meet tomorrow (17 February) for a Phase 1 review of the pullback.

This withdrawal includes dismantling military infrastructure like bunkers and withdrawing heavy weaponry like tanks.

Defence journalist Manu Pubby has shared a few videos which capture the Chinese withdrawal. These videos show the dismantling of Chinese tents and a large convoy retreating to rear areas.

India and China have reached an agreement to disengage troops from north and south of the Pangong lake in eastern Ladakh region.

The PLA will vacate the area between Finger 4 and 8, dismantle the structures it has built over the last nine months and keep its forces east of Finger 8.

Both India and China will not send patrols to the area between Fingers 4 and 8 till the time they reach an agreement on the issue.

Indian and Chinese forces will also start disengaging in the area south bank of the Pangong Lake (called Chushul sub-sector), the area where units of the Indian Army and Special Frontier Force had occupied tactically important heights of the Kailash Range on the intervening night of 29 and 30 August.

Presence on these heights gives the Indian Army a complete view of the region, including the Chinese base and camps near the Spanggur Lake.

It not only gives India control of the strategically-important Spanggur Gap, which China could use for an armoured thrust into the Chushul Bowl and further towards Leh, but also leaves Chinese camps and lines of communication around the Spanggur Gap vulnerable to Indian attack from the dominating heights.

Also Read: India-China Disengagement At Pangong Tso Explained