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Pakistan: Doctors Urge Govt To Reverse Its Decision Allowing Congregational Prayers In Mosques During Ramadan

Swarajya Staff

Apr 23, 2020, 04:34 PM | Updated 04:34 PM IST

Pakistani PM Imran Khan (Representative Image) (pic via Twitter)
Pakistani PM Imran Khan (Representative Image) (pic via Twitter)

In order to sustain the fight against novel coronavirus, many senior doctors in Pakistan have urged the Imran Khan government and clerics to reverse their decision to allow congregational prayers in mosques during the month of Ramadan, reports Wion News.

The doctors stated that the covid-19 spread could spiral out of hands due to the decision by Imran government. It should be noted that already more than 10,000 people have been infected by the deadly infection in the country.

Earlier, the Pakistani government held meetings with hardliner clerics after which they lifted precautionary restrictions on congregational prayers.

With the Ramadan beginning on Friday, the congregational strength is set to increase. Moreover, the longer Taraweeh prayers and waiting times will lead to prolonged gathering which may worsen the situation.

Dr Qaiser Sajjad, secretary-general of the Pakistan Medical Association, said in a meeting of doctors, “Unfortunately, our rulers have made a wrong decision; our clerics have shown a non-serious attitude.”

A TOI report states that a letter has been sent to government and religious leaders by the doctors asking them to limit the prayers to 3-5 persons.

In the same letter doctors have expressed concern that mostly people over the age of 50 go to the mosque, and they already face higher risk of the coronavirus.

"Clearly this has resulted in the violation of the first and foremost principle of preventing the spread of the virus in the most vulnerable group of elderly people,” stated the letter.

The doctors further stated that the 20-point standard operating procedure for mosques agreed between the government and religious leaders was not practical or implementable.


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