Science

Hubble Turns 27: Here Are 10 Overwhelmingly Beautiful Images Of Galaxies It Captured

The Galaxy as seen by Hubble
Snapshot
  • Happy birthday Hubble, and thank you!

This 24 April, the Hubble Telescope completed 27 years in space. In this these 27 years, it has made immensely valuable contributions to our understanding of the universe. And while it was doing so, it has also beamed us back jaw-dropping and inspiring photos of outer space. Given below, are ten of the most breathtaking images of galaxies that it captured.

Except for the last image, all text descriptions are as given by the European Space Agency.

1. The NGC 6861: A third kind of galaxy

Image credits: <em>ESA/Hubble &amp; NASA; acknowledgement: J. Barrington</em> Image credits: ESA/Hubble & NASA; acknowledgement: J. Barrington

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope view shows some important details of NGC 6861. One of the most prominent features is the disk of dark bands circling the centre of the galaxy. These dust lanes are a result of large clouds of dust particles obscuring the light emitted by the stars behind them.

Dust lanes are very useful for working out whether we are seeing the galaxy disk edge-on, face-on or, as is the case for NGC 6861, somewhat in the middle. Dust lanes like these are typical of a spiral galaxy. The dust lanes are embedded in a white oval shape, which is made up of huge numbers of stars orbiting the center of the galaxy. This oval is, rather puzzlingly, typical of an elliptical galaxy.

So which is it — spiral or elliptical? The answer is neither! NGC 6861 does not belong to either the spiral or the elliptical family of galaxies. It is a lenticular galaxy, a family which has features of both spirals and ellipticals.



2. A confused NGC 4388



Image credits: ESA/Hubble &amp; NASA. Image credits: ESA/Hubble & NASA.

Located some 60 million light-years away, NGC 4388 is experiencing some of the less desirable effects that come with belonging to such a massive galaxy cluster. It is undergoing a transformation and has taken on a somewhat confused identity.

While the galaxy’s outskirts appear smooth and featureless, a classic feature of an elliptical galaxy, its center displays remarkable dust lanes constrained within two symmetric spiral arms, which emerge from the galaxy’s glowing core — one of the obvious features of a spiral galaxy. Within the arms, speckles of bright blue mark the locations of young stars, indicating that NGC 4388 has hosted recent bursts of star formation

3. NGC 1448: The Grand Frisbee



Image Credit: ESA/Hubble &amp; NASA Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

This image from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) shows a section of NGC 1448, a spiral galaxy located about 50 million light-years from Earth in the little-known constellation of Horologium (The Pendulum Clock). We tend to think of spiral galaxies as massive and roughly circular celestial bodies, so this glittering oval does not immediately appear to fit the visual bill. What’s going on?

Imagine a spiral galaxy as a circular frisbee spinning gently in space. When we see it face on, our observations reveal a spectacular amount of detail and structure — a great example from Hubble is the telescope’s view of Messier 51, otherwise known as the Whirlpool Galaxy. However, the NGC 1448 frisbee is very nearly edge-on with respect to Earth, giving it an appearance that is more oval than circular. The spiral arms, which curve out from NGC 1448’s dense core, can just about be seen.

4. NGC 6814: The Cosmic Whirlpool



ESA/Hubble &amp; NASA; Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

Together with irregular galaxies, spiral galaxies make up approximately 60 percent of the galaxies in the local universe. However, despite their prevalence, each spiral galaxy is unique — like snowflakes, no two are alike. This is demonstrated by the striking face-on spiral galaxy NGC 6814, whose luminous nucleus and spectacular sweeping arms, rippled with an intricate pattern of dark dust, are captured in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image.

5. The Starburst in MCG+07-33-027



<b>Image credit: ESA/Hubble &amp; NASA and N. Grogin (STScI)</b> Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA and N. Grogin (STScI)

This image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and shows a starburst galaxy named MCG+07-33-027. This galaxy lies some 300 million light-years away from us, and is currently experiencing an extraordinarily high rate of star formation — a starburst.

Normal galaxies produce only a couple of new stars per year, but starburst galaxies can produce a hundred times more than that. As MCG+07-33-027 is seen face-on, the galaxy’s spiral arms and the bright star-forming regions within them are clearly visible and easy for astronomers to study.

6. NGC 4845: The Hungry Giant



Image credit: ESA/Hubble &amp; NASA and S. Smartt (Queen’s University Belfast) Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA and S. Smartt (Queen’s University Belfast)

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the spiral galaxy NGC 4845, located over 65 million light-years away in the constellation of Virgo (The Virgin). The galaxy’s orientation clearly reveals the galaxy’s striking spiral structure: a flat and dust-mottled disk surrounding a bright galactic bulge.

NGC 4845’s glowing center hosts a gigantic version of a black hole, known as a supermassive black hole. The presence of a black hole in a distant galaxy like NGC 4845 can be inferred from its effect on the galaxy’s innermost stars; these stars experience a strong gravitational pull from the black hole and whizz around the galaxy’s center much faster than otherwise.

7. NGC 6872: Distortions in The Peacock



Image credit: <a href="http://www.spacetelescope.org/">ESA/Hubble</a> &amp; <a href="http://www.nasa.gov/">NASA</a> / Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA / Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock). Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.

From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500,000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter! To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100,000 and 120,000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

8. NGC 4526: The halo with a black hole

ESA/Hubble &amp; NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

This neat little galaxy is known as NGC 4526. Its dark lanes of dust and bright diffuse glow make the galaxy appear to hang like a halo in the emptiness of space in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Although this image paints a picture of serenity, the galaxy is anything but. It is one of the brightest lenticular galaxies known, a category that lies somewhere between spirals and ellipticals. It has hosted two known supernova explosions, one in 1969 and another in 1994, and is known to have a colossal supermassive black hole at its center that has the mass of 450 million suns.

9. NGC 4038 and NGC 4039: A war which literally rips apart stars



Hubble/European Space Agency Hubble/European Space Agency

The galaxies — also known as NGC 4038 and NGC 4039 — are locked in a deadly embrace. Once normal, sedate spiral galaxies like the Milky Way, the pair have spent the past few hundred million years sparring with one another. This clash is so violent that stars have been ripped from their host galaxies to form a streaming arc between the two.

10. Three is a cosmic company



Image credits: NASA, ESA, and M. Livio and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Image credits: NASA, ESA, and M. Livio and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

NASA describes this image as: “Arp 274, also known as NGC 5679, is a system of three galaxies that appear to be partially overlapping in the image, although they may be at somewhat different distances. The spiral shapes of two of these galaxies appear mostly intact. The third galaxy (to the far left) is more compact, but shows evidence of star formation.”

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