‘Bow-Raksha’ Now Official US State Policy, But In India, Cow ‘Rakshaks’ Struggle For Validation

A woman with a her pet dog. (representative picture) (Kai Schwoerer/Getty Images)

The US has passed a legislation banning the slaughter of dogs and cats for human consumption, reports USA Today. A practice that is rare, it had been legal in 44 states.

The Bill, promulgated by Florida Representative Vern Buchanan, a Republican, and Alice Hastings, a Democrat, will now amend the Federal Animal Welfare Act to ban the slaughter of such pets. It was passed by a voice vote.

According to the Bill, it is illegal to knowingly slaughter, transport, buy or sell, or even donate dogs and cats or their parts for human consumption. The penalty prescribed for such an act is $5,000.

Buchanan hoped the Bill would be passed during the current session of the Senate before the Congress adjourns this fall.

Dogs and cats provide companionship to man, and, therefore, should not be slaughtered, he said. Other nations such as China, South Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos and India have also been urged to follow suit.

Taiwan became the first Asian nation to ban cat and dog slaughter last year.

Animal rights groups are ecstatic with this development.

The India story

Meanwhile in India, the cow, a creature that is held in high regard by millions across the country, and is also protected by several state laws, cow-rakshaks, basically an unofficial protective response to decades of cattle trafficking by smugglers, are a demonised lot.

Also Read: Being Gau Rakshaks: What It Takes To Stand Up Against Beef Mafia

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