Mumbai: 50 BMC Engineers To Attend Two-Day Training On Road Construction And Potholes At IIT Bombay

Mumbai: 50 BMC Engineers To Attend Two-Day Training On Road Construction And Potholes At IIT Bombay Pot holes at in Mumbai, India. Engineers will be trained to construct roads as well as the process and materials that are used and the proper mechanism to fill potholes. (representative image) (Photo by Kunal Patil/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

The Municipal body for greater Mumbai, Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), will be sending 50 engineers to Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (IIT-B), the Indian Express reports.

The engineers are being sent to IIT-B for a two-day training from the road and transport department, in a bid to provide better and pothole-free roads in Mumbai. The two-day training will cost the Municipal body Rs 14 lakh.

Engineers will be trained to construct roads as well as the process and materials that are used and the proper mechanism to fill potholes. Further, the training will include discussions over technical problems of persisting potholes.

Vinod Chithore, Director, Engineering Services and Projects, said, “The training has a five-point agenda mainly focusing on road construction and resurfacing. This is our routine knowledge sharing”. Further, the training also includes the success stories and the various mechanism used in road reconstruction in different cities.

The BMC currently follows an eight-point instruction manual to fix potholes with the cold mix which would also be a part of the discussion. An IIT professor, during a presentation on road construction to the BMC, on Thursday (3 January), stressed for the need of revamping the process for better effectiveness.

The body is also collating a pot hole-prone area list in all of the 24 wards that come under it and calculating the amount of cold mix needed in each neighbourhood. Starting from this month, the BMC will produce 1,200 metric tonnes of cold mix needed to fix potholes in monsoon.

In 2018, the civic body aimed to produce 2,500 metric tonnes of the cold mix but fell short due to delay in tendering process and obtaining raw materials that were needed.